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Weddings Elsewhere - Fall 2014

Something Old, Something New Something Borrowed, Something True Dear Unity Cross, Stephen and I have been married for six weeks now (yay!) and I just wanted to say – thank you. Our Unity Cross was one of the highlights of our wedding. With all the craziness – the flowers and camera flashes and relatives we hadn’t seen in years – the one thing that really stands out in our memory was when we assembled our Unity Cross during the ceremony. Just knowing Stephen and I were bringing Jesus right into the center of the most important day of our lives, showing how our commitment reflects Christ’s eternal love for us – well, it was just wonderful. It really transformed our vows into an act of worship. And the best thing was, after the wedding, people kept coming up to us and asking about the cross. It was by far the thing our friends and family commented on the most! Now, our Unity Cross sits on Stephen’s grandmother’s dresser in our room. I see it every morning when I wake up, and I remember our covenant to be faithful and forgiving to each other. I know we’ll always cherish it. So again, thank you so much for making our wedding that much more meaningful. Sincerely, Gina and Stephen Burke One of the world’s oldest symbols of love is now the newest wedding tradition: the Unity Cross® When it comes to symbolizing the bride and groom’s commitment during the ceremony, there aren’t a lot of choices. There’s the unity candles and the sand… but there’s never been an assembled piece of art for your home. A fi ne jewelry designer by trade, creator Michael Letney realized that – like wedding rings – wedding traditions should stand the test of time. The idea for an interactive, artisan-quality wedding sculpture was born. While the candles and sand only demonstrate that a couple is forever mingled together, the Unity Cross® digs deeper. Borrowing from one of the holiest icons in Western culture, the sculpture is made of two interconnecting crosses. The groom’s bold outer cross strengthens and frames his bride while the bride’s delicately carved inner cross brings fullness and beauty to her husband’s life. During the ceremony, the groom and bride join their crosses together, and secure them with three carved nails, representing the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Information cards included with the cross allow guests to follow along with the symbolism of the Unity Cross® during the wedding. “We’ve had just so many brides write to us saying how thankful they were that they could make their ceremony more meaningful and unique.” Letney went on, “I’m glad to be part of that.” And after the ceremony, the carved wood and resin sculpture takes on even more meaning in the home. With enough presence to anchor a fi replace mantle or curio cabinet display, the Unity Cross® is a beacon of the couple’s love for each other – and their future in Christ. The Unity Cross® comes with a small drawer in its base – a scroll of love verses is already included, and Letney recommends adding mementos like dried fl owers from the bouquet, a copy of the best man’s speech or photos. For another personalized touch, add an engraved plate with the couple’s names and wedding date. Letney is humbled by how much couples love the Unity Cross®. “You know, brides fi nally have another option for their unity service. It’s just so cool to see them embrace it. They get the symbolism. They get it.” The Unity Cross® makes something new from something old. It offers something unique and something lasting. And for brides, that’s really something special. from the Unity Cross® inbox... UNITYCROSS.COM UNTIL NOW.


Weddings Elsewhere - Fall 2014
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