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Weddings Elsewhere - Fall 2014

Tying the Knot WeddingsElsewhere.com 29 and, in a wedding ceremony, your deep and abiding love. A Bit More Traditional ome wedding rituals, such as the lighting of a Unity Candle, bring a sense of long-standing tradition to a ceremony. Honoring your Hispanic or Filipino heritage by including a Veil, Cord and Coin Ceremony is another unique way to personalize your ceremony. Another, lesser-used ritual is the Salt Ceremony: Though similar in form to the blending of sand, the meaning is very different. From earliest times, salt has been known as a preservative and purifier, an element that prevents decay and corruption. Entering into a “Covenant of Salt” meant binding oneself to another in utmost loyalty and truthfulness, even suffering death rather than breaking the covenant. For this very reason a Covenant of Salt was never taken lightly or haphazardly. A Marriage Salt Covenant does the same thing. Combining your individual containers of salt into a third receptacle symbolizes that your commitment to each other cannot be broken unless you can retrieve your own grains of salt. Since this is not possible, it is a symbol of an unbreakable covenant and vow of eternal union. “As these grains of salt are forever joined together, may you be forever joined as one!” Tying the Knot: We say it all the time when referring to marriage, but where does this saying come from? One theory is that in medieval times sailors would send a piece of rope to their sweethearts when they wanted to get married. If the rope came back with a knot in it, that meant she said “yes” to the marriage proposal. You might choose to tie a fisherman’s knot, also known as a true lover’s knot, at the end of your ceremony to symbolize your commitment to each other. This simple knot gets tighter and stronger under pressure—a powerful way to affirm that when stress and trouble pull on each of you, your marriage will be tighter and more secure. Whether you choose to include one of these special rituals in your wedding ceremony, or prefer to keep your “I do’s” simple, short and sweet, may you always cherish and sustain the uniqueness of your love for each other! ♥ Rev. Jeri Murphy, a non-denominational minister, has been performing wedding ceremonies in the Sacramento (California) area since 2000. She also loves to travel, and is an avid amateur photographer. Named AfWPI’s 2011 Professional of the Year, she has also received WeddingWire’s Bride’s Choice Award from 2009– 2014. She can be reached on her cell phone at 916.716.8374 or through her website www.RevJeriMurphy.com. S


Weddings Elsewhere - Fall 2014
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