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MASA Leader - Fall 2016

MASA Feature www.gomasa.org 21 drawing on research suggesting that rewarding students with non-reading-related prizes (as opposed to books or the like) makes it less likely that students will choose reading as an activity later (Marinak & Gambrell, 2008). When making this point, we avoided jargon such as the “reward proximity hypothesis” (that the most effective rewards are those that are as close as possible to the desired behavior) to maximize accessibility. We hoped that this attention to detail would maximize the degree to which the documents could help us coalesce as a state and improve literacy outcomes for our students. The Essentials formed the foundation of other documents created to address priority areas. Following the adoption of Pre-K and K-3 Essentials, Kristy Cooper, Ed.D., and Melissa Usiak, Ph.D., Michigan State University, led the development of the task force document Essential Schoolwide Practices. Susan L’Allier, Ph.D., led the development of Literacy Coaching Essential Practices. The task force adopted an aggressive timeline, and meets monthly during the academic year to continue to advance this important work. From Written Practices to Implementation: Developing a Theory of Action The task force includes members from many groups and represents diverse perspectives. We see the importance of not only defining core instructional prac-tices, but also identifying other supports and activities that contribute to literacy success for students. This includes the school-level activities, literacy leadership and coaching models that are necessary to support quality literacy instruction. Our theory of action to support successful readers at third grade requires a structure of supports from the system to the student level. If we have literacy instructional essentials articulated and adopted at the system level, • then we can align literacy policies, funding, initiatives, and resources throughout the system. If we focus on literacy at the school level in an intentional, multi-year manner, • then coaching can be embedded and sustained as a professional learning approach. If teaching teams and individual teachers are supported by quality coaching, • then we can develop instructional skills so we have high-quality instruc-tional practices in every classroom, for every student, every day. If we have the core essential instructional practices occurring in every classroom, every day, • then ALL students will further develop their literacy skills, improving third- and fourth-grade reading scores. Professional Learning Approach To support teacher learning around these early literacy instructional practices, the task force recognizes the importance of job-embedded ongoing


MASA Leader - Fall 2016
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