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RMW - May 2017

ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATER MAY 2017 | 25 HOT TOPICS source of water. Because of the hydrogeologic character of the unconsolidated aquifers in these basins and their legal distinction, designated basins offer good locations to implement ASR. How-ever, due to the prevalence of groundwater rights in designated basins, ASR projects would need to be attentive to changes in groundwater levels. In 1985, the General Assembly directed the State Engineer to promulgate rules and regulations governing the withdrawal of groundwater from the Denver Basin aquifers. Denver Basin groundwater is water within four successively overlying bedrock aquifers; the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills located within the 6,700-square mile structural Denver Basin between Greeley and Colorado Springs (Figure 3). In 1995, the State Engineer promulgated rules and regulations for the permit-ting and use of waters artificially recharged into the Denver Basin aquifers. The Denver Basin is the only aquifer system in Colorado with specific rules regulating the recharge and extraction of non-native water for storage purposes and as such is currently the only area in Colorado with active ASR projects. References CWCB (Colorado Water Conservation Board), 2007. SB06-193 Underground Water Storage Study. Colorado Water Conservation Board, Denver. Hobbs Jr., G. J., 2015. Citizen’s Guide to Colorado Water Law, 4th Edition. Colorado Foundation for Water Education, Denver. Topper, R.; Barkmann, P.E.; Bird, D.R.; & Sares, M.A., 2004. Artificial Recharge of Ground Water in Colorado: A Statewide Assessment. Colorado Geological Survey, Department of Natural Resources, Denver. Ralf Topper, C.P.G., recently retired after 16 years of service as the Senior Hydrogeologist in both the Colorado Division of Water Resources and the Colorado Geological Survey. He has advanced degrees in geology and hydrogeology from the University of Colorado-Boulder and Colorado School of Mines, and has more than 35 years of professional geoscience experience in both the private and public sectors. A Certified Professional Geologist, a Geologi-cal Society of America Fellow, he is an active member of both national and state groundwater societies. Topper has authored numerous papers and publications on Colorado’s groundwater resources including the award-winning Ground Water Atlas of Colorado. Kevin G. Rein, P.E., is the Deputy State Engineer at the Colorado Division of Water Resources. He manages well permitting, water court case review and litigation efforts, substitute water supply plan review and approval, and other activities associated with the administra-tion of surface water and ground water in the state. He also provides general support to the State Engineer and provides a point of contact for the Colorado General Assembly on legislative matters related to water administration. He has worked at the Division of Water Resources for 18 years.


RMW - May 2017
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