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RUMBLES - September 2015

hot topics industrial buildings or institutional facilities for the purpose of being put to beneficial uses. Sources of graywater are lim-ited to discharges from bathroom and laundry room sinks, bathtubs, showers, and laundry machines. Graywater does not include wastewater from toilets, urinals, kitchen sinks, dishwashers, or non-laundry utility sinks. Regulation 86 focuses on two graywater uses, namely subsur-face irrigation and indoor toilet flushing, and two users, which are single family and non-single family. The two graywater uses described above emulate allowed graywater uses in the major-ity of other western states. Stakeholders indicated that these allowed graywater uses would address the majority of the antici-pated graywater projects. The limited use approach also promotes development of local graywater programs by the local jurisdictions while additional graywater uses are considered. The Water Qual-ity Control Commission expects the adoption of modifications to Regulation 86 over time to allow for additional graywater uses, additional graywater users, and expanded treatment options. Regulation 86 defines four graywater use categories to address single family and non-single family graywater use for subsur-face irrigation (Categories A and B as defined in Regulation 86) and indoor toilet and urinal flushing (Categories C and D). Graywater is expected to contain human pathogens so each category has design criteria and control measure requirements that are intended to protect public health. Graywater used for 24 | RUMBLES SEPTEMBER 2015 irrigation must be discharged below the surface to a dispersed irrigation system with a filter to prevent irrigation system fail-ure or to a properly sized mulch basin. For indoor toilet and urinal flushing, Regulation 86 requires that graywater must be treated with a treatment system that is certified to the ANSI/ NSF 350-2011 standard, disinfected, and dyed to be visually different from potable water. Control measures compliment the required design components. These control measures attempt to control potential graywater exposure though the following: limitation of graywater contamination at the point of production (e.g., sink), proper operation of the treatment process, and limitation of graywater exposure at the graywater use (e.g., toilet or irrigation system). Regulation 86 is only one component of a larger legal frame-work all of which must be in place for graywater to be used legally in Colorado. In addition to Regulation 86, the Colorado Plumbing Board will also need to adopt a Colorado Plumb-ing Code version that allows for graywater piping within structures. The Colorado Plumbing Board does not have an estimated date or guarantee that graywater plumbing will be allowed. Similarly, the Colorado Water and Wastewater Operators Certification Board may require certified operators for some graywater treatment works, but has not set a timeline to take action. Lastly, any graywater use will also need to be in conformance with Colorado water rights which is regulated Defend Your Rate Structure FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Seminar Financial objectives in the drinking water industry are constantly changing, making successful planning more diffi cult and more important than ever. This three-day seminar teaches proven strategies for capital fi nance planning and rate setting. You’ll Learn How to $ Evaluate fi nancial policies and rate impacts $ Develop defendable, fair, equitable, and objective policies $ Recover the full cost of service by obtaining the rate your utility needs $ Avoid rate shock by using proven techniques of capital budgeting and analysis www.awwa.org/fi nancialmgmt FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Cost of Service Rate-Making Seminar November 18–20, 2015 | Salt Lake City, Utah


RUMBLES - September 2015
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