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RUMBLES - September 2015

operations RUMBLES SEPTEMBER 2015 | 29 options are there to reduce solids and save money? Some options may be inex-pensive and fall under the art/science of treatment category. For example, some operators have discovered repeated cir-culation through their system will help reduce solids. Some have discovered that bio-augmentation or bio-stimulation with the correct bacteria will help reduce solids wasting and solids build up. USEPA requirements on nutrient removal require some wastewater systems to design and build elaborate mechanical systems for the removal of nitrates, phosphates, ammonia, and other chemicals. Although these systems usually work, there are times when they need major adjustments. Get creative and adjust the operation of your system until you achieve adequate results. Wastewater treatment science is a starting point that can sometimes be improved by creativity, which in turn is the art of wastewater treatment. The Art of Pretreatment Although USEPA and the state environ-mental departments have set limits for significant industrial users (SIUs), these users often forget that pretreatment should be an art not a science. Should regulators, engineers, architects, and supervisors require you to do everything by the book? Or should there be some latitude for the art of wastewater treat-ment as long as you are meeting your permit requirements? Yes. Microbrewer-ies, meat packing plants, and many other SIUs add significant biological oxygen demand and total suspended solids loading, but should these facilities just be charged the highest surcharges, or should they be allowed to use the art of pretreatment to reduce loading? Remember, there is the theory/science of wastewater treatment that’s taught, and there is the art of wastewater treatment that’s executed daily by system opera-tors. For those who adhere strictly to the theory/science of wastewater treat-ment you may actually be diminishing the ingenuity and core competencies of your team. In the end it’s all science. The art is in its interpretation and application. Rick Allen is the author of Critical Issues for Water & Wastewater Profession-als, and provides consulting around the country on a variety of topics including pro-biotic and microbiological solutions for water and wastewater treatment. As the CEO of BioLynceus, he is invested in helping communities find natural solu-tions for managing treatment of water and wastewater. He can be reached at 303.888.2008 or by email at rick@ biolynceus.com. Ideal crop marks November 15–19, 2015 Salt Lake City, Utah Registration is Now Open! Water professionals around the world attend AWWA’s Water Quality Technology Conference & Exposition, the event of the year for providing answers about quality water in a continually changing environment. Check out these highlighted sessions: MON06 The Water Quality and Treatment TUE01 Water Quality Issues Associated with Distribution Systems and Premise Plumbing TUE03 Indirect Potable and Benefi cial Reuse WED01 Wastewater Impacts on Source Quality for Drinking Water WED02 Monitoring Control of Invasive Species The Premier Conference for Water Quality Professionals Around the World For more information, visit www.awwa.org/wqtc15 2385_wqtc15 HALF-rumbles.indd 1 5/13/2015 4:38:30 PM


RUMBLES - September 2015
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