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SOURCE - Winter 2016

Clean. Safe. Sustainable. Utility Service Group is the largest tank service firm in the United States. We created the Full Service Asset Management Program over 20 years ago to provide tank owners with comprehensive sustainable solutions to manage storage tank assets. The value of our Full Service Tank Maintenance Program: 16 SOURCE winter 2016 Monitoring Use. When we first started, we used a hand-written log to track usage; then in 2015, we decided to upgrade to a barcode scanner and put a bar code sticker on back of each ID card. Now when we punch in how many gallons each person takes, we automatically record where they come from and how many times they come for water. So far this calendar year our residential fill station customers have hauled away 27.85 million gallons of recycled water, compared to our commercial fill station, which has dispensed 25 million gallons. That the public is taking more water home in barrels and 300-gallon tanks than contractors, who haul 4,000-6,000 gallons at a time, is kind of mind blowing. Training. Training is available every day the fill station is open. It takes 5-10 minutes to train residents in the proper use of recycled water and how to haul water safely. For the first few days we used our existing staff and paid them overtime. We realized this was going to be expensive and made the decision to hire temps. In summer 2015, we had 15 temps working at the two stations. The staff trains the temps and the temps train the fill station users. Where do you go from here? When we kicked this off, we were only aiming at having it as an option when we restrict outdoor water use for irrigation. Our board is going to have to talk about what we want to do if our weather pattern returns to normal and the state is no longer in a drought. To be honest, I don’t know how we can shut it down. Problems. One of the realities of this kind of program is that you’re going to have at least a few people who get creative. We had people who installed tanks and pumps and pumped the recycled water into their irrigation system without understanding that this is against the law. We hired a consulting firm to help us do inspections so we can locate and correct these situations. Unforeseen benefits. This is a fantastic way to do outreach. People see that recycled water isn’t something dangerous to be afraid of. They become familiar with the wastewater plant and see how the multi-million dollar investment in recycled water benefits the community. They get to meet our staff. We couldn’t have bought this exposure. S • GASB 34 compliance • Comprehensive, sustainable management program • Renewable each year at tank owner’s option • Includes engineering services and renovations • Extends tank service life • Flat annual fee eliminates unplanned expenditures • Transfers rehabilitation risk Call us to discover how our sustainable and unique solutions can assist you in improving the management of your water system. Contact us at: Dublin, Continued from page 14 SHORTS MWD/LADWP/DWR Join Forces for Seismic Safety THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the California De-partment of Water Resources have joined forces for a seismic pre-paredness workshop in Spring 2016 to consider damage and water supply scenarios related to a major seismic event on the San Andreas Fault. The Los Angeles Aqueduct (LADWP), Colorado River Aqueduct (MWD), and East and West Branches of the State Water Project (DWR) all cross the fault. The workshop objective is to develop advance criteria to help facilitate prioriti-zation of repairs and to identify optimal solutions in case of an actual event. The three agencies formed the Seismic Resilient Water Supply Task Force in July 2015 with the idea of considering Southern California’s four independent aqueduct systems as one. The goal is to determine what can be done collectively to minimize potential water delivery impacts following a major event on the San Andreas Fault and how to mitigate potential damage so that normal water deliveries can be restored more rapidly. Near-term activities include aqueduct assessments and mitigation as well as emergency response, including preparing for effective collaboration of individual agency emergency response efforts and setting the stage for periodic joint-agency exercises focused on seismic resiliency. Long-term activities are aimed at evaluation of potential system improvements to aque-duct and non-aqueduct infrastructure and execution of periodic joint-agency emergency response exercises. S —David Clark, MWD Interim Facility Development Section Manager


SOURCE - Winter 2016
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