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SOURCE - Winter 2016

Moonin explains. “With this arrangement, we were able to proceed with project design, request contractor proposals, make the final contractor selection, and bring the contractor onboard at ap-proximately the time we approached 50 percent design, which was early enough for them to pro-vide input. They gave us our first cost estimate immediately after 50 percent, then again at 90 percent. We were able to successfully negotiate and take an agreed-upon price to our Board in September 2015. The contractor had already mo-bilized onsite as part of preconstruction services we had previously contracted for and was able to begin work immediately.” The new pumping station is being funded through low interest municipal bonds, to be re-paid through a SNWA rate increase phased in over five years, with an average annual increase on a typical monthly residential water bill of ap-proximately $2. Underground work is scheduled to be completed in 2018; above ground work will begin concurrently. The pumping station is scheduled to be in operation in 2020. S — Penelope Grenoble www.ca-nv-awwa.org 19 SNWA’s River Mountains Water Treatment Facility. The pumps and motor assemblies will be ap-proximately 50 feet long; each pump will draw 3,000-4,000 horsepower, with power supplied by an electrical cable strung down the discharge pipe. Because the pumps require a very strict tol-erance between the pump and the well casing, the well shafts must be drilled within two inches of variance at the bottom. Given that submers-ible pumps with the head and capacity required for this project have not been manufactured be-fore, SNWA has ordered prototypes from three different manufacturers to evaluate capability, performance, and quality before placing the or-der for the remaining pumps. Although no additional water treatment is currently planned, if continued declines in lake level cause substantial water quality degrada-tion, additional treatment improvements may be considered in the future. According to Project Director Erika Moonin, the impetus for fast-tracking the low lake level pumping station originated with the Resource Planning Advisory Committee, SNWA’s citizens advisory group. “Lake Mead provides ninety percent of the Las Vegas Valley’s water supply. The committee reviewed climate change projec-tions and the Bureau of Reclamation’s forecast for the Colorado River Basin and decided the community couldn’t accept the risk of being de-pendent on the two existing pumping stations. It recommended to the Board that we proceed with the low lake pumping station according to the swiftest feasible timeframe.” In May 2015, a Construction Manager at Risk (CMAR) contract was awarded to Barnard of Nevada, making it possible to bring the con-tractor in during the design process to provide ideas on construction means and methods and price alternatives. It also saved time that would otherwise have been invested in the bidding process. In a CMAR contract, the contractor owns the risk of employing and managing sub-contractors and managing the jobsite and takes the risk of any unknowns when developing a price before 100 percent of the design is com-pleted. To make it work, both parties must agree that contingencies are fair and reasonable. Go beneath the surface of your water network and control it like never before. To learn how we’re making smart water management possible, visit sensus.com/smart-water-network. SENSUS_83745_GoBeneath_CA-NV_AWWA_HalfPageH.indd 1 12/9/15 1:57 PM


SOURCE - Winter 2016
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