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SOURCE - Winter 2016

The restyled TRITON hydrant features a contoured head and fluted spool yet uses the same internal components as the previous design. In addition, these fire hydrants are produced by Mueller® at its Albertville, Alabama plant which assures customers that standard orders are filled rapidly. The new Jones TRITON design is UL listed & FM approved, meets AWWA C503 standards and rated to 250 psig. www.ca-nv-awwa.org 25 SPEAKING OUT Introducing the restyled Jones® TRITON® Wet Barrel Ductile Iron Fire Hydrant For information about the James Jones Company or to learn more about the TRITON wet barrel ductile iron hydrant, visit www.jamesjones.com or call 800.523.8618. all of its water supply “eggs” in one basket. The disruption of the early 1990s became the inspiration for a multi-faceted strategy to increase San Diego County’s water supply re-liability. We have ramped up our independent sources of supplies and in 2015, the amount of water we obtained from MWD dropped to 57 percent of our total supply. That figure is pro-jected to fall to 26 percent in 2020, then to 18 per-cent in 2025. MWD supplies are being replaced by conservation and transfer agreements with the Imperial Irrigation District transfer (30 per-cent of projected supplies in 2035), transferring water conserved by lining sections of the All American and Coachella Canals (12 percent); local surface water, recycled water, and ocean desalinization (seven percent each); ground-water (four percent) and planned potable reuse projects (15 percent). Water conservation has been a major ele-ment. More than 1.2 million low-flow toilets, water-saving showerheads, and high-efficiency clothes washers have been installed countywide since 1990. Today, the region’s urban potable wa-ter use is at 143 gallons per capita per day, well below the state’s mandated 2020 target of 167. Next came innovations in water supply de-velopment. After years of negotiations, the Wa-ter Authority helped secure the largest agricul-ture- to-urban water transfer in U.S. history as part of the 2003 Colorado River Quantification Settlement Agreement. The package of long-term agreements included transferring up to 280,000 acre-feet of conserved water annually from the Imperial Valley to San Diego County. Those high-priority supplies from the Colorado River have become a cornerstone of the San Diego re-gion’s water supply and spurred water conserva-tion efforts and funding in farm country, creating major benefits in both areas. The Water Authority also advanced water re-cycling and reuse by promoting scientific analy-sis and guidance from technical advisory panels, securing money to study related issues, conduct-ing polling to measure public support, and spon-soring state legislation to speed the adoption of regulations for potable reuse. The next major piece of the portfolio is seawater desalination. The Carlsbad Desalination Project, the private-public partnership that has resulted in the nation’s largest and most technologically advanced seawater desalination plant, is expect-ed to produce up to 56,000 acre-feet per year of drought-proof supplies for our service area. We have also committed to upgrading our in-frastructure with more than $2 billion in capital investments. The largest component was rais-ing the San Vicente Dam to store an addition-al 152,000 acre-feet of water for dry years and emergencies such as an earthquake that disrupts imported water deliveries. It was largest single increase in water storage in the county’s history. At every turn, the Water Authority had to address tough issues, answer critical questions, negotiate hard choices and navigate unforeseen obstacles. We have learned to embrace change, take prudent risks, find new partners and over-come daunting complications. Staying on course has demanded the continuous commitment of the entire Water Authority Board of Directors and staff. It also required the steadfast support of the region’s civic and business leaders, who first pressed the agency to craft a better plan more than two decades ago, then supported the investments needed to make it a reality. While we don’t know what new challenges will emerge tomorrow, we are confident those skills and strategies will en-sure that our future is as bright as our past. S


SOURCE - Winter 2016
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