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SOURCE - Winter 2016

and open to determine what is needed and how to best work within the organization they are assigned to. Before dispatching into unfamiliar territory, mutual aid responders should learn as much as possible about where they’re go-ing. They should gather available information about the incident and the surrounding utili-ties, transportation systems, and communica-tion networks. It’s also important to appreciate that the people who live and work in the area have experienced a major disaster, are highly stressed, possibly sleep-deprived, confused about the people who have arrived to “help” and apprehensive about what to expect next. Envision how you would want to be treated if you were in their shoes, and respond with pa-tience Ensure that you’re the right person for the job. I was assigned to the EOC as the Water/Utility Liaison because I have EOC Operations Section experience and I am familiar with water utili-ties. I would not have been as helpful in the field doing facilities assessment because I do not have a technical or engineering background. The SF-PUC and EBMUD water and wastewater system engineers who conducted field investigations PITTSBURG TANK & TOWER MAINTENANCE CO., INC. SAVE! We have a crew in YOUR AREA! FIRE RESPONSE Inspections Repair New & Used Tanks Wet In Service Cleaning Relocation Elevated Dry Paint Erection Underground ROV Insulation Dismantles Ground Storage ROV inspections can be viewed on TV console during inspection & DVD provided. All inspections include bound reports, recommendations and cost estimates. www.ca-nv-awwa.org 33 Vicky Caudill 270-826-9000 Ext. 107 www.watertank.com difficulties in tracking information. In many cases, information about infrastructure system status, repopulation of towns, and general staff-ing plans was lost or went unrecorded. Through general courtesy and lots of patience, I was able to establish a good working relationship with the responders from other agencies including PG&E, law enforcement agencies, local Lake County Public Works and care and shelter providers. During my deployment on the Valley Fire, I be-came aware of several factors that are important to success as a mutual aid responder: A clear mission task order for deployment. For operational considerations, including legal and coordination reasons, mutual responders should be sure that they are functioning within a clear mission order established by the state or the af-fected county. This should be provided by the dispatching agency and provide clear instruc-tions and tasks. Having a clear deployment mission order helps with coordination during the incident as well as documents and justifies post-emergency reimbursement from state and federal agencies. A respectful attitude and an open mind and ears. Out-of-area responders should be respectful and caring. For Clean, Safe Drinking Water, Prevention is Still The Best Medicine Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) and Ultraviolet Light (UV) effectively treat a wide variety of drinking water and potable water reuse challenges. • Preventing the formation of and removing already-formed harmful disinfection byproducts (DBPs) by removing organic matter (NOM/ EfOM) from source water • Providing a barrier against pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCP), endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC), and industrial chemical spills • Removing and destroying organic compounds, such as 1,2,3-TCP, TCE, PCE, and MTBE, and many others that cause unpleasant tastes and odors in drinking water • Providing effective treatment versus for Cryptosporidium and Giardia For improved sustainability and reduced operating cost, we now offer Custom Municipal Reactivated GAC. This process restores the capacity of your GAC, and is done in Calgon Carbon’s dedicated potable-exclusive reactivation facilities in full accordance with the latest AWWA B605 standard to ensure product safety. Contact us to learn how you can put our powerful GAC and UV technologies to work. calgoncarbon.com 1.800.422.7266 CalgonCarbon1/4pg.indd 1 6/20/14 1:47 PM were able to talk in common water system terms with managers and operators as well as having the resources to execute projects. Be prepared for resource and logistic deficits. It’s critical to come equipped with cell phones and laptops and other resources likely to be helpful in doing your job. Given the limitations of the Lake County EOC, constant cooperation within and between responding divisions was neces-sary to overcome the situation’s technological burdens. Lodging was set up through CalOES at a base camp run by Cal Fire. This meant that responders had a place to sleep close to the action, but that luxuries were limited. Crowded rooms of cots used by people from all different parts of the state and in differing levels of response meant that everyone had to remain flexible. It took responding to the Lake Fire for me to understand that mutual aid, though sometimes stressful and logistically difficult, is necessary to provide vital support systems and assistance during incidents that can overwhelm a single agency or jurisdiction—and what it takes to de-ploy this vast network of support, coordination, and resources effectively. S


SOURCE - Winter 2016
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