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SOURCE - Winter 2016

The Pont du Gard www.ca-nv-awwa.org 9 SSS California Relief for CR6 Compliance CALIFORNIA’S LEGISLATURE PASSED Senate Bill  385 (SB385 Primary Drinking Water Standards: Hexavalent Chromium: Compliance Plan), which Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law on September 4, 2015 with immediate effectiveness as “an urgency statute.” This timely legislation addresses one of the more egregious burdens imposed on water systems by the Legislature, made worse by state court decisions that require compliance without providing time to meet statutory regulations. SB385 addresses this legislated burden by providing compliance (schedule) relief to water systems that have to reduce hexavalent chromium concentrations in their source water. The text of the bill includes details about public notification and reports that will be required within a carefully monitored process. (See http://leginfo. legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_ id=201520160SB385.) SSSS Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins INCREASED USEPA CONCERN about Harm-ful Algal Blooms (HABs) throughout the Unit-ed States includes several source water supplies in Nevada and California. The HAB issue is anticipated to increase as climate changes im-pact water quality—especially temperature— and quantity, both total annual amounts and in stormwater runoff. (A recreational lake in the San Francisco Bay area was closed to pets in summer 2015 because of fatal cyanotoxins exposure that could result from animals’ direct contact without consumption of the contaminated water). SSS Federal Regulatory Developments USEPA MAY REVISE its fluoride concentration guidelines in response to the U.S. Depart-ment of Health and Human Services April 2015 revised fluoride guideline (0.7 mg/L). As I not-ed in my Summer 2015 column, California and Nevada are expected to make similar changes to their fluoride guidelines. In response to USEPA’s preliminary deter-mination to regulate strontium (Sr) and a lower Health Reference Level (HRL) set at 1.5 mg/L, Section member Issam Najm, President of WQTS, Inc., has completed an evaluation of Sr occurrence and treatment options. The Water Research Foundation report indicates that only one-half of one percent of systems in Nevada and California with Sr data have concentrations that require treatment (23 systems total). As an alka-line earth metal, Sr can be removed by precipi-tation with carbonate (CO-2) or sulfate (SO3 4 -2) at high pH, using nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, ion exchange or adsorption processes. Each treat-ment technology produces waste and disposal challenges. More details will be available in the report, due for release in 2016. In May 2015, the USEPA and Army Corps of Engineers published the final Waters of the U.S. Rule, intended to clarify jurisdictional issues. Both individual states and private parties have filed legal objections that will delay and com-plicate current uncertainties related to the ap-plication of the rule to California’s new NPDES Statewide General Permit for Water System Dis-charges. It will likely be several years, however, before this issue is settled. There has been increased concern about health risks due to Legionella in premises plumbing, espe-cially at large facilities that have hot water recir-culation systems. As I mentioned previously, staff of the Nevada Department of Environment Protec-tion has been working with several large facilities that add supplemental chemical disinfectants to their water systems. SSS Other California Drinking Water Regulations CALIFORNIA’S NEW 1,2,3 Tri-chloropropane (TCP) regulation was scheduled for release before this issue of SOURCE is published. De-partment of Drinking Water (DDW) staff indicates that its current antic-ipated 1,2,3, TCP regulatory release will be in 2016 or 2017. It will be pru-dent to check source water supplies in anticipation of its regulation. DDW staff also indicates that there will be a statewide series of training workshops for water agencies on the Revised Total Coliform Rule in 2016. Water systems should contact their local DDW Field Operations Branch Dis-trict office to obtain information on dates for the closest workshops. DDW is working on three tasks associated with treatment and use of reclaimed water under the same legislature-imposed deadline. The first is to develop and adopt water recy-cling criteria for indirect potable water (IPR) reuse through surface water augmentation (SWA) by December 31, 2016. The second is to submit a report to the legislature on the fea-sibility of developing uniform water recycling criteria for direct potable reuse (DPR) by the same date. The third requires that the State Wa-ter Resources Control Board determine if an-imals drinking tertiary disinfected reclaimed water pose a significant risk to public health and the health of the animals themselves. SSS Time To Go IT HAS BEEN AN HONOR to have served as the Section’s Safe Drinking Water Committee Chair for the past three years, and a challenge to provide timely information to SOURCE readers about drinking water regulatory developments. As I pass the Committee Chair’s gavel to Rick Zimmer, I send him, and all of you, best wish-es for a future with reasonable and achievable drinking water regulations that ensure Califor-nians and Nevadans will continue to enjoy the best quality drinking water on earth. As a closing thought, I hope that our endeav-ors are as beneficial, if not as lasting, as the Pont du Gard, a bridge and aqueduct constructed 2,000 years ago under the Roman Empire to de-liver high quality water to Nimes, France. We may not leave as lasting an impact on the physi-cal landscape, or on generations to come, but we can hope that we will leave an equally positive legacy for our peers, customers, and families. S DRIPS & DROPLETS Craig Thompson, P.E., BCEE, completed a term as CA-NV AWWA SDWA Committee Chair. He has 28-years of regulatory compliance, water quality analysis and treatment experience and is Principal Engineer in West Yost Associates’ Walnut Creek office, specializing in water quality and treatment plant design/operations.


SOURCE - Winter 2016
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